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Abstract Photography: Beyond the Literal Representation

submitted on 20 August 2023 by photographerlistings.org

Defying Convention: The Daring World of Abstract Photography

Hold on to your pretentiously tiny cups of espresso and prepare to have your monocles fall right off your face, because we are delving into the esoteric realm of abstract photography. You see, in this subversive corner of the art world, photographers scoff at the mundane, the literal, and the pedestrian. Instead, they choose to explore the tantalizing world of the intangible, the ambiguous, and the downright befuddling. So come along, dear friend, and let us cast off the shackles of traditional photography and boldly venture into the unknown.

The Anti-Selfie: Turning the Camera Away from Reality

Abstract photography is akin to the anti-selfie. It's not about capturing the perfect angle of your face in front of some allegedly interesting landmark. Rather, it's about turning the camera in on itself, or even pointing it directly at the garish wallpaper in your aunt's guest bathroom. The point is, it's all about breaking the rules and not giving a hoot about what anyone thinks.But before you go snapping photos of every wrinkled tissue and discarded lollipop stick you come across, let's establish some ground rules. Not because we want to impose order on your newfound artistic freedom, but rather, so you can better understand how to destroy that order with the utmost of grace and panache.

Textures, Shapes, and Colors, Oh My!

One of the foundational aspects of abstract photography is the focus on textures, shapes, and colors. These elements can be used to create a sense of depth, motion, and even emotion in your images. Forget about that family portrait you were forced to take at the beach with everyone wearing matching white shirts and khakis. Instead, imagine photographing the sun's rays shining through the agitated water, creating mesmerizing patterns of light and shadow.Experiment with different surfaces, materials, and lighting conditions to create a variety of textural and visual effects. You might even find beauty and intrigue in the most unexpected places, like the chipped paint on an old bicycle or the vibrant colors of a rusty, abandoned car.

Blurry on Purpose: The Art of Intentional Camera Movement

As any amateur photographer can attest, sometimes photos come out a bit fuzzy, but in the world of abstract photography, that fuzziness can be downright intentional. Intentional camera movement (ICM) is a technique used by abstract photographers to create a sense of motion and energy in their images. It involves deliberately moving the camera while the shutter is open, resulting in a blurred, dreamlike effect.This technique is perfect for those of us who have never quite mastered the art of holding a camera steady. Simply embrace your shaky hands and let the camera dance and sway as if it's had one too many martinis.
  • Try experimenting with different shutter speeds to see how it affects the amount of blur in your images.
  • Move the camera in various directions (up and down, side to side, diagonal) to create different patterns and effects.
  • Don't be afraid to get weird with it - the whole point of abstract photography is to push boundaries and challenge expectations, so let your creativity run wild!

Enter the Void: Negative Space and Minimalism

Some people might say that less is more, but in abstract photography, less can be darn near everything. Embracing negative space and minimalism in your images can create a sense of balance and simplicity that draws the viewer in and forces them to focus on the subject at hand. So, the next time you're at a party, instead of snapping yet another photo of someone doing a keg stand, try photographing the empty, overturned solo cup on the floor, surrounded by a sea of white tile.Remember, the goal is not necessarily to make your viewer understand the subject of your image, but rather to evoke a feeling or a sense of mystery. And what's more mysterious than an empty cup, abandoned in the midst of revelry?

Embrace Your Inner Abstract Photographer

Now that you've been armed with the knowledge and techniques to delve into the world of abstract photography, it's time to set forth and boldly capture the beauty in the ordinary, the extraordinary, and everything in between. Remember, the only limit to your creative expression is your own inhibition.So go forth and photograph with reckless abandon, my fellow abstractionists, and let the world be bewildered and beguiled by your unconventional masterpieces.

 







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